Microbes

Microbes is multidisciplinary international, open access, peer reviewed scientific journal committed to publish original research, critical reviews, and short communications, reporting theoretical, experimental, applied, and descriptive work in all aspects of microbial science.

Managing Editor: Dr. Sajjad Hyder
Country of Publication: Pakistan
Format: Print & Online
Frequency: 03
Publication Dates: April, August, December
Language: English
Author Fees: Yes
Types of Journal: Academic/Scholarly Journal
Access: Open Access
Indexed & Abstracted: Yes
Policy: Double blind peer-reviewed
Review Time: 04-06 weeks approximately
Contact & Submission e-mail: microbes@esciencepress.net
Alternate e-mail: info@esciencepress.net


Microbes

Journal Scope

The journal aims to serve the research community by providing a platform for researchers to publish quality research in both fundamental and applied microbiology. The journal considers submissions on microbes infecting or interacting with microbes, plants, animals, and humans covering the following aspects:

  • Agricultural microbiology

  • Beneficial microbes

  • computational, systems, & synthetic microbiology

  • Environmental microbiology

  • Food microbiology

  • Industrial microbiology

  • Medical & pharmaceutical microbiology

  • Microbial physiology & ecology

  • Microbial biochemistry

  • Microbial genetics & genomics

  • Microbial biotechnology

  • veterinary microbiology

 

Microbes follow guidelines by Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). Microbes takes the responsibility to enforce a rigorous peer-review together with strict ethical policies and standards to ensure to add high quality scientific works to the field of scholarly publication. Unfortunately, cases of plagiarism, data falsification, inappropriate authorship credit, and the like, do arise. Microbes takes such publishing ethics issues very seriously and our editors are trained to proceed in such cases with a zero tolerance policy. To verify the originality of content submitted to our journals, we use iThenticate to check submissions against previous publications. Microbes works with PUBLONS to provide reviewers with credit for their work.

Latest News on Microbes

 

Environmental monitoring offers low-cost tool for typhoid fever surveillance

Researchers can accurately track where typhoid fever cases are highest by monitoring environmental samples for viruses called bacteriophages that specifically infect the bacterium that causes typhoid fever.
Posted: 2024-02-15More...
 

Do sugar-free candy and gum give you gas? Researchers think they know why

Scientists may have figured out why some people have trouble digesting sorbitol, a sugar alcohol used in sugar-free gum, mints, candy and other products.
Posted: 2024-02-15More...
 

When it comes to bad breath, some bacterial interactions really stink

Researchers found that the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii activates another bacterial species, Fusobacterium nucleatum, to produce large quantities of methyl mercaptan, a compound responsible for bad breath. Disrupting this interaction could therefore help treat halitosis, and possibly also help prevent the development of more serious tooth and gum disease.
Posted: 2024-02-15More...
 

Root microbes may be the secret to a better tasting cup of tea

You'd think the complex flavor in a quality cup of tea would depend mainly on the tea varieties used to make it. But a new study shows that the making of a delicious cup of tea depends on another key ingredient: the collection of microbes found on tea roots. By altering that assemblage, the authors showed that they could make good-quality tea even better.
Posted: 2024-02-15More...
 

Ancient retroviruses played a key role in the evolution of vertebrate brains

Researchers report that ancient viruses may be to thank for myelin -- and, by extension, our large, complex brains. The team found that a retrovirus-derived genetic element or 'retrotransposon' is essential for myelin production in mammals, amphibians, and fish. The gene sequence, which they dubbed 'RetroMyelin,' is likely a result of ancient viral infection, and comparisons of RetroMyelin in mammals, amphibians, and fish suggest that retroviral infection and genome-invasion events occurred separately in each of these groups.
Posted: 2024-02-15More...
 

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